I really do wish that more therapists, hypnotists, NLPers, etc... would adopt his all out approach to creating change. He's intensely curious and goes out of his way to explore new and interesting ways to do things. From this book I was able to see that it was nice to know that there are others out in the world exploring the limits of what can be done with NLP and Hypnosis.
"Sometimes life has a way of placing unexpected challenges in our path. It is the goal of my practice to help my clients find the strength to overcome these challenges. When someone makes the decision to seek counseling I believe this is a statement, by that person, they have the capacity to resolve their problems, with my assistance. I bring a vast array of professional and life experience into my practice. I have attained my Approved Consultants Status with the American Society Clinical Hypnosis. I am very excited that I am able to add the use of hypnotherapy to my practice."

Most relaxation techniques require daily practice to be effective. A variety of formats for teaching relaxation and meditation exist, including classes as well as individual sessions. Relaxation can be taught in 1 session by conducting and audio taping a relaxation session. Using the audio tape, patients can then practice the techniques daily at home. Methods such as progressive muscle relaxation are easy to learn; yoga, tai chi, and meditation can take years to master completely.
The analysis method of hypnotherapy, sometimes referred to as regression therapy, is more exploratory and related to uncovering the root of an issue, disorder or symptom. A hypnotherapist will hypnotize a patient by putting them into a relaxed state and exploring a past event in their life in order to explore the person’s subconscious and unconscious memory.
In 2011, a Russian "evil hypnotist" was suspected of tricking customers in banks around Stavropol into giving away thousands of pounds worth of money. According to the local police, he would approach them and make them withdraw all of the money from their bank accounts, which they would then freely give to the man.[158] A similar incident was reported in London in 2014, where a video seemingly showed a robber hypnotizing a shopkeeper before robbing him. The victim did nothing to stop the robber from looting his pockets and taking his cash, only calling out the thief when he was already getting away.[159][160]
The following person had completed years of graduate school plus substantial hypnotherapy training at various schools before he took our 200-hour program in 2013. He was so impressed that he returned in 2015 and took our training again. Here's his response after completing that. Since he wrote this, he completed our graduate clinical courses twice plus our hypnotherapy training a 3rd time, and is planning to take our training for a 4th time in 2019!
Systems theory, in this context, may be regarded as an extension of Braid's original conceptualization of hypnosis as involving "the brain and nervous system generally".[74](p31) Systems theory considers the nervous system's organization into interacting subsystems. Hypnotic phenomena thus involve not only increased or decreased activity of particular subsystems, but also their interaction. A central phenomenon in this regard is that of feedback loops, which suggest a mechanism for creating hypnotic phenomena.[183]
It is important to keep in mind that hypnosis is like any other therapeutic modality: it is of major benefit to some patients with some problems, and it is helpful with many other patients, but it can fail, just like any other clinical method. For this reason, we emphasize that we are not "hypnotists", but health care professionals who use hypnosis along with other tools of our professions.
If you're looking for Hypnotherapy in Dallas or for a Dallas Hypno therapist these professionals provide hypnotherapy, hypnosis hypnotherapy, hypnotherapy weight loss, smoking hypnotherapy and clinical hypnotherapy. They include clinical hypnotherapists in Dallas plus Hypno therapists, Hypno psychologists, Hypno psychotherapists and Hypno counselors.
A form of healthcare in which a trance-like state is induced in an individual, allowing a therapist to contact the unconscious mind and (in theory) effect changes in the individual’s mental status and behaviour. For some, hypnotherapy evokes atavistic regression—a return to a state in which instinct is allowed a freer reign than is the norm in the current consciousness-oriented society. Hypnotherapy has been used as an adjunct in controlling acute and chronic pain (and may be used in place of anaesthetics); it is useful in addiction (alcohol, tobacco and abuse substance) disorders.
In Trance on Trial, a 1989 text directed at the legal profession, legal scholar Alan W. Scheflin and psychologist Jerrold Lee Shapiro observed that the "deeper" the hypnotism, the more likely a particular characteristic is to appear, and the greater extent to which it is manifested. Scheflin and Shapiro identified 20 separate characteristics that hypnotized subjects might display:[15] "dissociation"; "detachment"; "suggestibility", "ideosensory activity";[16] "catalepsy"; "ideomotor responsiveness";[17] "age regression"; "revivification"; "hypermnesia"; "[automatic or suggested] amnesia"; "posthypnotic responses"; "hypnotic analgesia and anesthesia"; "glove anesthesia";[18] "somnambulism";[19] "automatic writing"; "time distortion"; "release of inhibitions"; "change in capacity for volitional activity"; "trance logic";[20] and "effortless imagination".
However, Freud gradually abandoned hypnotism in favour of psychoanalysis, emphasizing free association and interpretation of the unconscious. Struggling with the great expense of time that psychoanalysis required, Freud later suggested that it might be combined with hypnotic suggestion to hasten the outcome of treatment, but that this would probably weaken the outcome: "It is very probable, too, that the application of our therapy to numbers will compel us to alloy the pure gold of analysis plentifully with the copper of direct [hypnotic] suggestion."[62]
Hypnotherapy is a form of psychotherapy used to create change in a patient while in a state of sleep, or unconsciousness, known as hypnosis. The word hypnosis comes from the Greek word “hypnos” which simply means, “sleep.” The therapy itself uses guided relaxation techniques from a trained hypnotist that invoke feelings of intense relaxation, concentration, and/or focus to achieve a heightened state of awareness or trance-like state.
In the 1950s, Milton H. Erickson developed a radically different approach to hypnotism, which has subsequently become known as "Ericksonian hypnotherapy" or "Neo-Ericksonian hypnotherapy." Erickson made use of an informal conversational approach with many clients and complex language patterns, and therapeutic strategies. This divergence from tradition led some of his colleagues, including Andre Weitzenhoffer, to dispute whether Erickson was right to label his approach "hypnosis" at all.[10]
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